The Belgian Malinois’s Road To Paradise

A dog like no other, the Belgian Malinois is unique in its necessity for goals. It needs plans, and needs to feel inserted into an overall project it can call its own. It will work tirelessly to achieve its results; it is patient, and it is fierce. The absence of a project essentially kills the dog slowly, as it watches itself willow in the purposelessness of its own life. It will start venting its frustrations on anything that is around it and eventually it will self-destruct, cognitively and physically. Aspects like the weather or the humour of surrounding animals seem to mean very little to a Belgian Malinois, as its mission rules supreme. Within the brain of a Belgian Malinois who is on a mission are fireworks!

 

A small group of people, likely very few, with the exact quantity unknowable, are the human Belgian Malinois. The pure breeds. Everyone else is simply placed along that Belgian Malinois continuum, meaning they range from zero of the dog's need for project to a considerable amout of the dog's drive. Those close to being pure breeds, need meaningful missions that shape all aspects of their lives, from their choice of food based on ease of digestion, to the amount of sleep. While the thought of anonymity or of wasting their potential makes them ill, the real drive comes from a need of "order", which only an all-encompassing mission can provide. They alone, without their mission, are not able to experience order. Knowledge that there are a certain number of days to complete a mission alignes all secondary necessities to the primary goal.

 

In Apocalypse Now, sergent Willard is the human Belgian Malinois in the story, as there are no hobbies, passtimes, friends, or past that Willard cares sufficiently about or wants us to know about. There is one thing that holds Willard together, one thing that gives meaning to all these other secondary aspects of his life. He tells us at the beginning of the movie:

"Everyone gets everything he wants. I wanted a mission, and for my sins, they gave me one."

Just as the Belgium Malinois is to freedom and inertia, the human producer is to admin and repetition: insanity.

We need a task, one we can call our own. One we will execute with creativity and diligence. Through our mission we will acquire freedom, an indirect freedom whose taste is so gratifying precisely because it has been allowed to us from ourselves. Freedom has a beginning and an end, as work has framed it for us. Freedom is a function of work, and presents itself as a flake resting on the extensive shoulders of work.

Our mission, our work, our production. Its all the same thing, and it acts as the glue in our lives, binding and framing all other aspects of our lives. 

Neuchâtel, Switzerland